End Points
End Points
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"I remember working with a law school in which white men heavily dominated the faculty. They used lots of sports metaphors (doing an end run, Monday morning quarterbacking, and so on), with legal jargon thrown in for good measure. I suggested that this was not a particularly welcoming trait in their school, that in fact it was sexist, but they paid little attention. I made my point by speaking for about five minutes in dressmaking terms: putting a dart in here, a gusset there, cutting the budget on the bias so it would be more flexible, using a peplum to hide a course that might be controversial. The women in the room laughed; the men did not find it humorous….Language is power, make no mistake about it. It is used to include and exclude and to keep people and systems in their places."

Frances E. Kendall, Understanding White Privilege (via nadashannon)

Interesting

(via wincherella)

Language is Power.

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

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classicladiesofcolor:

Dancer and choreographer Joan Miller founded the dance program at Lehman College in 1968 and helped to establish it as a bridge to Broadway. 
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schomburgcenter:

Gail Fisher, who broke many racial barriers for black women on American television, was born August 18, 1935. Her mother raised her and her siblings with her own hair styling business in Edison, New Jersey. During her teenage years, Fisher had showed an interest in entertainment through her participation in various beauty contests, acting in her High School’s plays and as a cheerleader. Fisher studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, after winning a contest sponsored by Coca-Cola, and later became a member of the Repertory Theater at Lincoln Center. She did many television commercials and declared herself “the first black female— no, make that black, period— to make a national TV commercial, on camera, with lines.” Her most well known and one of the first major roles for black women was as the secretary “Peggy Fair” on the show Mannix from 1968 until 1975. Fisher, pictured with Mark Stewart, as her son in Mannix (1970), won two Golden Globes and an Emmy Award  for the role. She was the first black woman to win an Emmy Award. 
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classicladiesofcolor:

Model La-Jeune Hundley won the title of the Cannes “Miss Film Festival” in 1960 as reported in The New York Times.
(Top photo from Ophelia DeVore)
classicladiesofcolor:

Model La-Jeune Hundley won the title of the Cannes “Miss Film Festival” in 1960 as reported in The New York Times.
(Top photo from Ophelia DeVore)
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classicladiesofcolor:

Dancer, choreographer, and actress Carmen De Lavallade
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classicladiesofcolor:

Actress Benevenita Washington in Green Pastures (1936)
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classicladiesofcolor:

“Coby Yee, billed as “China’s Most Daring Dancing Doll,” bought the Forbidden City nightclub in the early 1960s.” - (Collectors Weekly)
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bluese4:

skins—uk:

Skins Blog
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